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Groove of the Day/Madonna/”Impressive Instant”/Peter Rauhofer Universal Club Mix

A legendary DJ, entertainer and straight up talent after all of our thunderous dance music hearts, dearly departed NYC owning DJ Peter Rauhofer only had one mission while he was on this dance music planet–to make us fucking move for our god damn lives….and that he most certainly did. 

Before he became an NYC dance music icon, Mr. Rauhofer spent his earlier dance days in his hometown of Vienna, Austria. While working at a local record store that was stacked and ready with all kinds of delicious imports, he fell in deep with the dance music decadence (don’t we all?) that would soon not just become a part of his life, but a part of our lives as well.

By the early ’80s, Rauhofer got his practice on while making his rounds spinning at clubs around town. A few months into those magic moments, he would link up with a small Austrian record label, GIG Records, and quickly become their international A&R director, which would serve him with beatloads of success, most notably when his production of “Let Me Be Your Underwear,” released under the legendary Club 69 moniker became a breakthrough smash on the U.S. dance charts. The monster banger not only set the stage for the debut of the Club 69 full-length, Adults Only (all day), but it would soon find Rauhofer managing his time between Austria and the States. 

By the time the late ’90s rolled (literally) around, Rauhofer had become a funkdafied force to be reckoned with on the exploding dance scene (which he certainly helped ignite), as he would expand his headphones beyond the delightfully gripping talons of Club 69, going on to record under even more dance music monikers, including House Heroes (“Magic Orgasm,” yas dancing queen) ) and speaking of kweens, “Pimps, Pumps & Pushers” also became another certified smash that would be served to all of us under another famous Rauhofer disguise, Size Queen.

After using all of those monikers to create the official Club 69 record label, sophomore set, Style, was soon dished out, instantly becoming a fan favorite and Billboard bulldozing success, thanks to the power of “Drama” and “Muscles,” which are still simply that fire. Also during this whirling time, Rauhofer lent his headphones to the ultra-successful Essential Mix collections and was also became a highly sought after remixer, owning assignments from lots and lots of big names including dearly departed divas Whitney Houston & Donna Summer, as well as Mariah Carey, Ultra Nate, Scissor Sisters, Xtina, Suzanne Palmer, Britney Spears (that fucking “Toxic” remix, though) Pet Shop Boys, Lady Gaga, RiRi, Yoko Ono (yes, that Yoko Ono) and the one-and-only Cher, in which his powerhouse remix of “Believe” would hand him a Grammy for Remixer of the Year. Certainly well, well deserved.

Of course, one diva that Rauhofer had so much fun with remixing for days was our favorite Material Girl, Madonna, of which the turntable mastermind took several of her singles, including “American Life,” “Get Together” (that fucking Private Vocal Mix, though), “Miles Away” and “4 Minutes” and turned them into pieces of destructive dance music art. 

The same can also be said for his pounding take on Madge’s fourth Music single, “Impressive Instant,” which you know he spun the fuck out at Limelight, Roxy, Rosaland Ballroom or any other NYC hotspot he gave it to us on the dance floor of life. When the iconic DJ left us on May 7th, 2013 after losing his battle with a brain tumor, he not only left us with a legacy, but beats in a collection that will sound as fresh as the day as he served them out to us. 

And that is the straight up Peter Rauhofer dance music truth. 

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5 Reasons Why You Should Listen to Madonna’s ‘Ray of Light’ Right This Second

“You only see what your eyes want to see
How can life be what you want it to be
You’re frozen
When your heart’s not open”

Coos a breathy, newly conformed Madonna on her chilly late-’90s smash, “Frozen,” a song that would not only deliver an accompanying gothic desert draped video that had all of us clutching our Madonna pearls when it premiered on MTV (Feb 16th, 1998. to be exact.), but the somber sonnet would also hold the key into Madonna’s brilliantly beautiful Ray of Light music gates.

After returning to pop music to get her Lourdes and Evita on, Ms. Madonna linked up with legendary techno producer William Orbit as her collaborator for the project in what was indeed an esteemed effort to keep her music claws sharp in staying on top of contemporary music trends-and it worked like an “Ashtangi” charm.

Because of Madonna and Orbit’s subtle, brilliant attack they took the eccentricities of electronica to new levels while managing to retain Madonna’s foundation-her feisty flair for soaring pop melodies. Together, the dynamic duo succeeded in creating what was the first mainstream pop album that embraced techno..and got it right.

Also, Madonna’s vocals were just simply on point. While, yes, Light is one of her most adventurous music rides, the album soars because of the wonderfully constructed Evita-like mannerisms of Madonna’s precise singing. Whether it’s on the electronically twisted title track, the whispering opener, “Substitute for Love,” the Molly-dripping, “Skin,” or the mind numbing, “Frozen,” Ray of Light is just that record.

Here at Philly Mixtape, we would never ask you stop what you’re doing in your day, but when it comes to Ray of Light, you absolutely need to get lost in Madonna’s Grammy-winning set right this second–and here are 5 reasons why.

 

1.It’s the perfect record for those “ugh” days…

While we all wish everyday to be as perky as Kelly Ripa, we indeed all have those days when we’re feeling more like Fiona Apple in ’96. Lucky for all of us, Madonna served us with the perfect album for when you just want to zen out and not smack somebody with your Boy Toy belt.

Blessed with a set list of wild, whirling grooves, deep tones, and lyrics about coming closer to just maybe figuring it all the f#$k out, (I mean, “Sky Fits Heaven“..bliss.), Madonna’s wonderful seventh studio set not only showcased a tremendous amount of growth for her as an artist, but her fans also grew up;basking in a record that still has the ability to musically lift us up no matter what kind of Britney-in-’07 day were having. 

2.It will take your workout to new spiritual levels…

Planning on hitting the gym today? Or, maybe you’ll be doing some yoga and Pilates in a room full of hotties? Well, you need to immediately turn on the Light and prepare to really put the Jane back in your Fonda during your workout while getting musically served with this classic record.

The opening orbs of “Drowned World/Substitute for Love” will play out perfectly for those opening stretches. The deep house decadence of “Nothing Really Matters” will have you hitting that bench press for your life, and the wonderfully weird electro-drums of “Ashanti/Shantagi” will have you getting into yoga positions you never thought possible.

But indeed, it’s the album’s title track that really gets the blood pumping with its heart-attack inducing Orbit throb, which is blended with perfection to coincide with Madonna’s zephyr-licious vocals.

Ready…set….Stair Master.

3.It’s a ’90s record….that doesn’t sound ’90s at all.

While Light was served up in the ’90s, it doesn’t have the feel or the sound of the sometimes musically ratchet decade. In fact, it doesn’t even sound like 2015. Meaning that Madonna and Orbit knew what they were doing by creating a world of sounds that were meant to be in a futuristic time warp of their very own.

The murky music tones of “Swim” still play out like an apocalyptic anthem-for-the-ages. The Jetsons-esque vibe of  “Skin” still feels like something Rosie would get down to in an after hours dance club in the future. Even softer Light spots, “To Have and Not To Hold,” “Little Star,” and third single,”The Power of Goodbye” still contain the strength to make that music love kick in just a little bit harder.

4.All those remixes….

While each of the offerings on Ray of Light were already tailor-made for the dance floor of life, a handful of legendary DJs came along and pretty much took every track from Madge’s synth-soaked set and turned them into an even better versions of themselves. 

The most daring remix during the Ray of Light era (for more, click here) came when DJ legends Peter Rauhofer and Victor Calderone took the spaced-out “Skin” and turned it into even more a futuristic music mind fuck than it already is. You just have to put those headphones on and listen….right now.

5.It’s one of Madonna’s best records. Red strings down. 

If you were to ask any Madonna fan what their favorite Queen of Pop album is, there’s no doubt that each and every answer would be different. But if you were to ask them to make a list of their top 3 favorite Madge studio sets, Ray of Light is the one album that would be on everybody‘s lists.

Not only is Madonna’s incredible music journey just all wrapped in great music, but it still stirs up all of the right music feelings and emotions. Ms. Ciccone’s Ray of Light also still plays out like breath of fresh of air that it was nearly 20 years ago–and that’s the best part.

“Shanti/Ashtangi” for life.

 

 

 

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Werkout Groove of the Day/Ultra Nate/”Found a Cure”/Club 69 Insane Remix

Today’s workout groove is a very special one  for many reasons, kids. For one, we’re about to unleash the insane Club 69 remix of Ultra Nate’s classic groove, “Found a Cure,” which will absolutely get you shakin’ those carbs right off.  Two, the name Club 69 was just one of the monikers used by the late, great DJ Peter Rauhofer, who’s 50th birthday would’ve been today. While we’ll never know just what Mr. Rauhofer would’ve been serving up these days had he still be with us, but his amazing catalog of dance hits and remixes explode for themselves-and will certainly live on, where they will deliciously drip in our headphones for all of music eternity. 

Before you guys get lost in this delicious remix, get lost in this ‘Rewerk Wednesday’ from January when Philly Mixtape honored the dearly departed DJ in all of his glorious thunder.